Call for Entries: Made in the South Awards

Our fifth annual hunt for the best Southern-made products

Read More »

The Southern Agenda: August/September 2014

Goings-on in the South and beyond »

A Meeting of the Barbecue Minds

By Jed PortmanGood EatsJuly 15, 2014

Last Thursday night, at Scott’s Bar-B-Que in Hemingway, South Carolina, two giants of Southern barbecue met for the first time. As the sun went down, John Lewis, the lanky head cook at La Barbecue in Austin, stepped around the pits where whole-hog veteran Rodney Scott smokes more than a dozen pigs each week. The Texas pit master peppered the South Carolina pit master with questions: How much space do you keep between the hogs and the coals? How do you keep the temperature steady? Lewis helped Scott move a piece of furniture. They walked to the picnic tables across the street, sat down, and ate together.

Read More »

Bastille Day Southern-Style

By Lindsey ReynoldsGood EatsJuly 14, 2014

Though some of the biggest Bastille Day festivities went down yesterday, today is officially France’s commemoration holiday. To celebrate, we’re highlighting the new wave of French-inspired brasseries that have recently begun popping up across the South.

Read More »

A New Day for Duck Head

By M.K. QuinlanBelle DecorJuly 7, 2014

It was 1978 when the first pair of Duck Head chinos hit shelves at the campus store at the University of Mississippi, igniting a trend that would last for the next fifteen years. The khakis—complete with their iconic yellow logo—became part of the Southern frat boy uniform in the eighties, alongside popped collars and braided belts. But the company’s history actually goes back much further, almost 150 years in fact. And now, Duck Head is returning with a renewed focus on its Southern roots. 

Read More »

Tennessee Whiskey Jam

By Jed PortmanGood EatsJuly 7, 2014

The pairing of whiskey and country ham is one of the most timeless and reliably delicious in all of Southern cuisine. And at the 404 Kitchen in Nashville, Tennessee, chef Matt Bolus has devised a fresh way to bring the two staples together. He serves shaved country ham with biscuits, red-eye gravy, and dollops of whiskey jam, a spiced fruit butter with a base of raisins, apple cider, and corn liquor. It’s strong stuff, and pairs nicely with cured meats of all sorts, as well as cheese and, hell, just about anything else you might enjoy with a glass of brown water.

Read More »

Made in the South Awards: Meet Judge Brooks Reitz

By Elizabeth HutchisonGood EatsJuly 2, 2014

Charleston, South Carolina-based Made in the South Awards judge Brooks Reitz is a busy guy. In addition to opening Leon’s, his new fried chicken and oyster house, he’s got a coffee shop in the works, and he’s a partner in the just-launched Khi Khi Milk Co., a globally inspired beverage company. Despite the harried schedule, though, Reitz continues to appreciate things done the old-fashioned way—slow and by hand. As the founder of Jack Rudy Cocktail Co., he’s helping to revive forgotten staples of the American bar one bottle of artisanal grenadine, tonic, and aromatic bitters at a time. To celebrate beach season, we asked Reitz to come up with a couple of refreshing summertime cocktails

Read More »

Made in the South Awards Winner Update

By Jed PortmanGood EatsJune 30, 2014

When Bittermilk nabbed the top spot in the drinks category of our 2013 Made in the South Awards last year, the Charleston, South Carolina, line of craft cocktail mixers consisted of three products: a smoked-honey whiskey sour mix, a hopped and elderflower-perfumed Tom Collins mix, and an outstanding burnt-sugar Old Fashioned mix, all carefully positioned at the intersection of bitter, sweet, and sour. Demand for the mixers soared, and founders Joe and MariElena Raya, buoyed by the company’s quick and early success, set to work on a fourth formulation. “Did the Made in the South Awards change our business? It launched our business, basically,” says Joe Raya, who also runs the Gin Joint, one of the Holy City’s best bars, with MariElena. “We were bottling by hand when we got into the magazine, and suddenly, I swear, I was working twenty-four hour stretches some days. But it was amazing, and really got us off the ground.” 

Read More »

Delta Dogs

By CJ LotzBelow the LineJune 30, 2014

Delta Dogs, a new collection of photographs from Maude Schuyler Clay, showcases the quietest corners of the Mississippi River Delta and the four-legged inhabitants who roam there. Clay, who hails from Greenwood, Mississippi, spent fifteen years driving the state’s back roads to photograph eroding architecture, desolate cotton and crop fields, foggy woods, and other forgotten spaces across the region—and the dogs romping through them all. “It was the stark contrast of the landscape that really didn’t lend itself to people,” Clay writes in the book’s closing essay. “The dogs give it a kind of scale and a certain wildness that people would not.&rdquo

Read More »

Southern Food Group: Tamales

By Amy C. EvansGood EatsJune 27, 2014

The Southern Foodways Alliance and Garden & Gun decided to rewrite the food pyramid in 2014 by introducing the twelve Southern food groups. Thus far, we’ve covered oysters, gumbo, boudin, fried chicken, and barbecue. This month, we crank up the blues, roll down the windows, and head to the Mississippi Delta for hot tamales.

Read More »

Behold the Bisnut

By Jed PortmanGood EatsJune 26, 2014

If you’ve kept even a wandering eye on the culinary world over the past year, you’ve probably heard something about the cronut, the flaky croissant-doughnut hybrid that made a minor celebrity of New York City pastry chef Dominique Ansel in 2013. The cronut has inspired plenty of imitators, but none have hit quite as close to home for us here at Garden & Gun as the latest, from fast-food chain Carl’s Jr.

Read More »

Happening Now: Texas Tiki Week

By Jed PortmanGood EatsJune 24, 2014

If you’ve noticed a resurgence of fluorescent, umbrella-topped drinks in your favorite darkened haunts, you’re not alone. Tiki is back. “It’s a nice antidote to how precious cocktails became for a lot of people,” says Jessica Sanders, who runs the Austin, Texas, bar drink.well. “Bartenders got a little bored with themselves, and this whole idea that cocktails must be brown and bitter and stirred. Now, we’re taking all the knowledge and craft that we’ve learned in the past decade and applying it to something creative and fun.”

Read More »
Subscribe to Garden and Gun RSS